Use cases


Use case 1: Record the history of items

How does it work?

The following things can be recorded on the blockchain:

  • Ownership history
  • Achievement history
  • Previous prices paid for it
Does it need blockchain? Why?

Yes - centralized hubs have been shown to be insecure (ie. Steam hacks). They rely on inferior cryptography techniques, and they leave themselves open to a variety of different attacks.

Why is this cool? / What cool feature does this enable in video games?
  • Items can be valuable if used by particular gamers or in particularly high profile matches
  • Items can be used as an investment
  • Better as a collectible item as history can be proven
  • Items can evolve according to various historical events, ie. if a sword has achieved 10 kills of the White Master Dragon, it becomes a super-sword and has greater powers

Use case 2: Games can be interoperable

How does it work?
  • Games that agree to be interoperable commit that certain events/items in one game will have a particular meaning in another. These agreements can be recorded in the code of shared items and executed using smart contracts such that certain things that occur in one game will trigger something else in another.
  • There is a universal timestamp for the recording of actions and ownership which all games who agree to be interoperable can rely on, without having to trust the history record of any particular game.
Does it need blockchain? Why?

Yes - because if a global yardstick were not used, games would have to trust the history records of a central database, which may be controlled by a particular game company that has, or may develop, an incentive to change or alter this to the detriment of other games relying on it.

Arguably, it may not need a public blockchain - the games who agree to be interoperable with each other might just use a private blockchain between them. Another compelling reason for developers to create blockchain games (or have game items as tokens on the blockchain) is that if other games are working on interoperability, it will be easy for them to start being able to interoperate with those other games if they decide to do so in the future.

Why is this cool? / What cool feature does this enable in video games?

One NFT can represent different things in different game worlds. A player's stats in one game can contribute to their stats in another, or represent a particular thing.


Use case 3: Greater security for transactions in games

How does it work?

Existing weak points for security in games is centralised database where payment methods are kept (ie. credit card details) makes a central point of failure

Does it need blockchain? Why?

Yes - centralized hubs have been shown to be insecure (ie. Steam hacks). They rely on inferior cryptography techniques, and they leave themselves open to a variety of different attacks.

Why is this cool? / What cool feature does this enable in video games?

Gamers are less at risk at having their personal or financial data exposed.


Use case 4: True ownership of assets (including accounts)

How does it work?

Each game item is represented as a fungible or non-fungible token on the blockchain, which means that whoever owns it, through whatever method of receipt (gift, airdrop, purchase, etc.), is verified by consensus on a public blockchain and that ownership cannot be revoked by anybody other than the token holder. Blockchain has, so far, been proven to be the most secure and hack-proof form of ownership of digital tokens.

Does it need blockchain? Why?

Yes - you don't 'truly own' something if it's being held by a company who can revoke access anytime.

Why is this cool? / What cool feature does this enable in video games?
  • Game developers are no longer their games' central banks
  • Gamers can make a living from trading valuable game items.
  • Gamers are more inclined to purchase items because they can sell it on the open market and reclaim the cost.
  • Gamers can invest in assets that may become more valuable in the future.

Use case 5: Crowdfund games

How does it work?

In exchange for contributions of various fiat and crypto currencies game developers give out tokens that, they say, have some sort of value or provide some function in the game to be built.

Caveat to note: Whilst the ownership of that particular digital token cannot be revoked by anyone and is forever in the possession of the recipient, if they so choose, the function or value that the token may have in the game is subject to the discretion of the developer. Unless other aspects of the game (game mechanics, graphics, game itself) are also stored decentrally, the token holder may find himself in possession of a useless or largely devalued token and without any recourse.

Does it need blockchain? Why?

Yes - but only if it wants to hand out digital tokens that offer the recipient true ownership in exchange for their contribution.

No - if it can find contributors who do not demand a digital token and are happy with simply contributing, or for getting recognition (named in credits), or who trust the company's word that they will provide a physical gift or copy of the game to them, then there's no advantage to the developers to give out blockchain tokens.

Why is this cool? / What cool feature does this enable in video games?
  • Enable game developers to build a community of invested supporters
  • Potentially greater collaboration between game developers and supporters, who may have more of a say in the development of the game
  • Make it easy for game developers to give further items to supporters using airdrops

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